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For Immediate Release
August 2, 2012

Contact:
Jason Wolfe, Wolfe PR
(520) 399-5097
E-mail: jason@wolfenews.com

Beryl Wolfe, Wolfe PR
(520) 399-5770

Web Site: http://www.beach2beacon.org

PRESS KIT: Variety of materials re: 2012 TD Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race

Contents:

Fact Sheet 14-Year Timeline 2011 Results Past Champions Fun Facts Race Founder Joan Benoit Samuelson Bio Race Director Dave McGillivray Bio History of Race Beneficiaries Title Sponsor TD Bank Background

 

Fact Sheet
 
15th Annual
 
TD Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race – 2012

Date of Race: Saturday, August 4, 2012

Title Sponsor: TD Bank www.TDBank.com

Website: www.beach2beacon.org

Distance: 10 kilometers (6.2 miles)

Size of Field: 6,000

Mission of Race: The TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, provides a cash donation of $30,000 to a different Maine charity each year as a way to support and benefit the state.

2012 Youth Beneficiary: The Center for Grieving Children is a Portland, Maine-based nonprofit organization providing support to bereaved children and families. The CGC has served more than 66,000 children, teens, and families through peer support, outreach and education. For more information, visit www.cgcmaine.org.

History: TD Bank and Joan Benoit Samuelson, winner of Olympic gold in the first women’s marathon in 1984 and Maine’s most recognizable athlete, founded the race in 1998 as a way to support Maine children by creating a world-class event for the state. The race draws top elite athletes from around the globe as well as top Maine and New England runners. Event features 800+ volunteers and thousands of spectators. Races: 10K Wheelchair division at 7:55 a.m., and runners at 8:05 a.m. A children’s 1K race will take place on Friday, Aug. 3 at Fort Williams.

Purse: More than $60,000 in prize money

Race Director: Dave McGillivray, DMSE Sports, Inc.

Race President: Dave Weatherbie, Cape Elizabeth

Start/Finish: Picturesque 6.2-mile course in Cape Elizabeth, beginning at Crescent Beach along Route 77 and ending 6.2 miles later in Fort Williams at the stunning Portland Head lighthouse.

Corporate Partners: In addition to TD Bank, other major corporate partners are Hannaford, Poland Spring, MaineHealth, Fairchild Semiconductor, Nike, Northeast Delta Dental, IDEXX and WCSH6-TV.

More info: www.beach2beacon.org or www.wolfenews.com for press info and news.

 

14-year Timeline

1998 – Inaugural year for the race, founded by Joan Benoit Samuelson and called the Peoples Beach to Beacon 10K after the title sponsor. The race had a field size of 3,000 and drew 2,408 finishers.

1999 – Field size increases to 4,000 and the race becomes the first road race in Maine history to top 3,000 finishers as 3,248 crossed the line. Khalid Khannouchi of Morocco sets a course-record 27 minutes, 48 seconds, the first recorded sub-28- minute 10K ever run in Maine.

2000 - Two-time defending champion Catherine Ndereba of Kenya edged U.S. Olympian Libbie Hickman in a finish that required a ruling by a team of judges, including referee Steve Vaitones, a certified USA Track & Field official. Both runners, with identical official times of 32:19, thought they had won, but Vaitones and the other judges determined Ndereba crossed the finish first. Adding drama to the race was the fact that Ndereba fell at about the 1.5-mile mark, got stepped on and scraped her knee and shoulder, but still managed to get back up and grit out a victory.

2001 - Honorary guest for the 2001 Peoples Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race was Sir Roger Bannister, the legendary British runner who on May 6, 1954, ran the world's first recorded sub-four-minute mile. The then-25-year-old native of Harrow on the Hill, England, completed the distance in 3:59.4 at Oxford. Race Director Dave McGillivray was named the world's outstanding race director for 2000 for his direction of the third Peoples Beach to Beach 10K Road Race by Road Race Management, Inc. and Lynx System Developers, Inc., based in Woburn, Mass., began providing a FinishLynx, a versatile digital photofinish and timing system.

2002 - Field expands to 5,000 to accommodate more runners and commemorate the 5th year of the race. The race also introduces the Corporate Challenge where teams of at least four employees from New England corporations and businesses compete using net times and adjusted by age and gender under the WAVA (World Association of Veteran Athletes) system. Joan Benoit Samuelson runs with a group of New York City firefighters to commemorate the 5th year.

2003 - Gov. John Baldacci was the first sitting Maine governor to run in the race, still called the Peoples Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race. Baldacci ran as part of the Seeds of Peace team. Also, 16-Year-Old Eric Giddings of South Portland is the Maine winner and Gilbert Okari of Kenya (27:28) shattered the four-year-old course record by 20 seconds.

2004 – The race again boasted the year’s fastest time in a 10K road race in the world when Kenya’s Gilbert Okari broke the tape at 27:35. In all, four men record crossed in under 28, almost unheard of on the international road race circuit.

2005 – Name changes to TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon. Among runners from Maine, Stanford-bound Eric Giddings of South Portland set a new Maine record with a time of 30:34 while still a teenager at 18 and dressed in his South Portland High School Red Riots singlet.

2006 – Race fills in just 46 days – eclipsing the 2005 record by almost two weeks – despite an expansion of the field by 500 slots to a total of 5,500. Russia’s Alevtina Ivanova broke the women’s record, running away from the field with a time of 31:26 to claim her first Beach to Beacon title after finishing second and third that last two years and breaking Kenyan Catherine Ndereba’s five-year-old record of 31:33.

2007 – Special 10th edition of the TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon again fills in record time. This race featured Joan Benoit Samuelson running a leisurely 42:00 pace alongside friend Jacqueline Gareau, the 1980 Boston Marathon champ. Each runner in the field of 5,500 who completed the race received a commemorative medal. More than 110 runners ran for the 10th time, including Larry Wold, President of TD Bank in Maine. Kenya's Duncan Kibet out kicked a fast field to win the men’s crown as the popular Meb Keflezighi, the U.S.'s top distance runner, finished fourth. Luminita Talpos of Romania dominated the women’s race, winning for the first time in five tries.

2008 - Ed Muge sprinted to the finish to earn the men’s crown and ageless Edith Masai cruised to victory in the women’s race in the 11th edition of the race. Muge of Kenya (27:52.4) edged Ethiopia’s Maregu Zewdie (27:53), the world’s top-ranked road racer, down the homestretch in thrilling fashion. But the day belonged to the 41-year-old Masai, who dominated her younger competitors in 31:55.6, which also shattered the course record in the Master’s category for women. The two Kenyans were among the record-setting 5,258 runners from 14 countries and 41 U.S. states who finished the race on a cool, humid and foggy morning. In the Maine races, Kristin Barry, 34, of Scarborough (34:37) shattered the longest standing course record, set by Julia Kirtland of South Harpswell with a 34:56 in 1998, the race’s inaugural year. And in winning the Maine race, Ben True, 22, of North Yarmouth (31:02), also was the first American finisher in the race, finishing 11th overall.

2009 - Ed Muge of Kenya (28:05) repeated as the men's champ and Kenya's Irene Limika (32:06) cruised in for the women's title, but a pair of Mainers stole the show for the 12th running of the TD Bank Beach to Beacon. Ben True of North Yarmouth (29:10) and Sheri Piers of Falmouth (34:17) shattered course records to easily win the Maine titles and each finished 10th overall - a first for Maine runners in the international road race. Both course records are likely to stand for some time. A record-setting 5,624 runners, from 16 countries and 43 U.S. states, finished the race on a warm and sunny morning. The summer of 2009 marked the 25th anniversary of race founder Joan Benoit Samuelson's historic gold medal performance in the first Olympic women's marathon. At the Beach to Beacon, the ever-modest Samuelson was a fixture at the finish line cheering and greeting recreational runners.

2010 - Kenyan Lineth Chepkurui (30:59) shattered the women’s course record and Gebre Gebremariam of Ethiopia sprinted to the men’s title in the 13th edition of the TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race. In the Maine Resident races, Kristin Barry (34:34.9) of Scarborough reclaimed the women’s title, edging defending champ and course record holder Sheri Piers (34:35.2) of Falmouth by the slimmest of margins, while Patrick Tarpy (29:28) of Yarmouth cruised to his first men’s title. The winners were among the record-setting 5,672 runners from 17 countries and 41 U.S. states who competed on a cool, calm, idyllic morning on the Maine coast. Thousands of spectators lined the course to cheer the runners. Also, legendary marathoner and two-time Olympic silver medalist Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, a five-time TD Bank Beach to Beacon champ and former course record holder, was returning from injury and placed sixth (33:34).

2011 - Kenyan Micah Kogo (27:48) used his Olympic track speed to wear down a talented men's field and Aheza Kiros (32:09) of Ethiopia cruised to victory on the women's side in the 14th edition of the TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race. In the Maine Resident races, Sheri Piers of Falmouth pushed through the heat and humidity to reclaim the women's title, while Louie Luchini of Ellsworth, a decorated collegian turned State Representative, put a stamp on his legacy in the men's race. The winners were among the record-setting 5,876 runners from 12 countries, 43 states and more than 200 Maine cities and towns who crossed the finish line on a sunny, warm and humid morning on the Maine coast.

 
TD Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race
 
2011 RESULTS
 
TOP MALE FINISHER:
Micah Kogo of Kenya, 27:48
 
TOP FEMALE FINISHER:
Aheza Kiros of Ethiopia, 32:09
 
TOP MALE MASTERS FINISHER:
James Koskei of Kenya, 30:27
 
TOP FEMALE MASTERS FINISHER:
Nuta Olaru of Romania, 34:07
 
TOP MALE MAINE FINISHER:
Louie Luchini of Ellsworth, 30:36
 
TOP FEMALE MAINE FINISHER:
Sheri Piers of Falmouth, 35:11
 
TOP MALE WHEELCHAIR FINISHER:
Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 23:39
 
TOP FEMALE WHEELCHAIR FINISHER:
Christina Kouros of Cape Elizabeth, Maine (53:33)
 
SENIOR DIVISION (50+)
Brian Pilcher of Ross, Calif., 34:00 Jeanne Hackett of Scarborough, Maine, 41:11
 
 
TD BEACH TO BEACON 10K ROAD RACE
 
Past Champions

2011

Elite Male: Micah Kogo of Kenya, 27:48
Elite Female: Aheza Kiros of Ethiopia, 32:09
Masters Male: James Koskei of Kenya, 30:27
Master Female: Nuta Olaru of Romania, 34:07
Maine Male: Louie Luchini of Ellsworth, 30:36
Maine Female: Sheri Piers of Falmouth, 35:11
Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J. 23:39
Female Wheelchair: Christina Kouros, Cape Elizabeth, Maine 53:33
Senior Division (50+): Brian Pilcher of Ross, Calif. 34:00; Jeanne Hackett of Scarborough, Maine 41:11

2010
Elite Male: Gebre Gebremariam of Ethiopia, 27:40
Elite Female: Lineth Chepkurui of Kenya, 30:59 (course record)
Masters Male: James Koskei of Kenya, 29:55
Master Female: Christina Reaser of Dayton, Maine, 39:18
Maine Male: Patrick Tarpy of Yarmouth, 29:28
Maine Female: Kristin Barry of Scarborough, 34:35
Male Wheelchair: Craig Blanchette of Battle Ground, Wash., 24:12
Female Wheelchair: Catherine Jalbert of Brewer, Maine, 1:30:00
Senior Division (50+): Norm Larson of Burlington, Vermont 33:30; Jeanne Hackett of Scarborough, Maine 39:48

2009

Elite Male: Ed Muge of Kenya, 28:05

Elite Female: Irene Limika of Kenya, 32:06

Masters Male: James Koskei of Kenya, 30:01

Master Female: Susannah Beck of Brunswick, Maine, 35:31

Maine Male: Ben True of North Yarmouth, 29:10 (course record)

Maine Female: Sheri Piers of Falmouth, 34:17 (course record)

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 23:34

Female Wheelchair: Jacqui Kapinowski of Point Pleasant, N.J., 42:33

Senior Division (50+): Brian Pilcher of Ross, Calif. 33:51 Jeanne Hackett of Scarborough, Maine 39:39

2008

Elite Male: Ed Muge of Kenya, 27:52

Elite Female: Edith Masai of Kenya, 31:57

Masters Male: Dan Franek of South Portland, Maine, 32:55

Master Female: Edith Masai of Kenya, 31:57 (course record)

Maine Male: Ben True of North Yarmouth, 31:02

Maine Female: Kristin Barry of Scarborough, 34:37

Male Wheelchair: Patrick Doak of Concord, Mass., 23:35

Female Wheelchair: Jacqui Kapinowski of Point Pleasant, N.J., 40:29

Senior Division (50+): Norm Larson, 52, of Burlington, Vermont, 33:51 Ellie Tucker, 53, of North Yarmouth, Maine, 41:27

2007

Elite Male: Duncan Kibet of Kenya, 27:52

Elite Female: Luminita Talpos of Romania, 32:20

Masters Male: Jason Cakouros of Milton, Mass., 32:43

Master Female: Mimi Fallon of Walpole, Mass., 37:51

Maine Male: Ayalew Taye of Cape Elizabeth, 30:47

Maine Female: Emily Levan of Wiscasset, 35:01

Male Wheelchair: Patrick Doak of Concord, Mass., 23:27 (course record)

Female Wheelchair: No entrants

2006

Elite Male: Tom Nyariki of Kenya, 27:48

Elite Female: Alventina Ivanova of Russia, 31:26

Masters Male: Wayne Levy of Newton, Mass., 32:52

Master Female: Mimi Fallon of Walpole, Mass., 37:32

Maine Male: Donny Drake of Portland, 31:16

Maine Female: Emily Levan of Wiscasset, 35:40

Male Wheelchair: Patrick Doak of Concord, Mass., 23:59

Female Wheelchair: No entrants

2005

Elite Male: Gilbert Okari of Kenya, 27:38

Elite Female: Lornah Kipligat of The Netherlands, 31:34

Masters Male: Mbarek Hussein of Albuquerque, N.M., 29:40

Master Female: Ramilia Burangulova of Gainesville, Florida, 34:38

Maine Male: Eric Giddings of South Portland, 30:34

Maine Female: Emily Levan of Wiscasset, 35:52

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 25:35

Female Wheelchair: Laurie Stephens of Wenham, Mass., 30:23

2004

Elite Male: Gilbert Okari of Kenya, 27:35

Elite Female: Susan Chepkemei of Kenya, 31:35

Masters Male: Michael Payson of Falmouth, Maine, 31:54

Master Female: Valentina Yegorova of Russia, 34:36

Maine Male: Ethan Hemphill of Freeport, 31:35

Maine Female: Susannah Beck of Yarmouth, 35:22

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 25:11

Female Wheelchair: Laurie Stephens of Wenham, Mass., 33:32

2003

Elite Male: Gilbert Okari of Kenya, 27:28 (course record)

Elite Female: Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, 31:53

Masters Male: Andrew Masai of Kenya, 29:24

Master Female: Carmen Ayala-Troncoso of Austin, Texas, 35:11

Maine Male: Eric Giddings of South Portland, 31:18

Maine Female: Maggie Hanson of Bowdoinham, 35:47

Male Wheelchair: Kamel Ayari of New Rochelle, N.Y., 25:00

Female Wheelchair: April Coughlin of Syracuse, N.Y., 33:32

2002

Elite Male: James Koskei of Kenya, 28:11

Elite Female: Adriana Fernandez of Mexico, 31:56

Masters Male: Eddy Hellybuck of Albuquerque, N.M., 29:49

Master Female: Elana Fidatof of Romania, 34:14

Maine Male: Andy Spaulding of Freeport, 31:26

Maine Female: Christine Snow-Reaser of Dayton, 36:30

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 24:12

Female Wheelchair: Laurie Stephens of Wenham, Mass., 33:11

2001

Elite Male: Evans Rutto of Kenya, 28:30

Elite Female: Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, 31:33

Masters Male: Andrew Masai of Kenya, 29:37

Master Female: Judy St. Hilaire of Somerset, Mass., 33:53

Maine Male: Andy Spaulding of Freeport, 31:29

Maine Female: Christine Snow-Reaser of Dayton, 36:13

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 24:59

Female Wheelchair: Laurie Stephens of Wenham, Mass., 30:51

2000

Elite Male: Joseph Kimani of Kenya, 28:07

Elite Female: Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, 32:19

Masters Male: Andrew Masai of Kenya, 29:12 (course record)

Master Female: Judy St. Hilaire of Somerset, Mass., 33:37

Maine Male: Todd Coffin of Freeport, 31:36

Maine Female: Julia Kirtland of South Harpswell, 35:35

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 24:34

Female Wheelchair: Laurie Stephens of Wenham, Mass., 30:25

1999

Elite Male: Khalid Khannouchi of Morocco, 27:48

Elite Female: Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, 32:05

Masters Male: John Tuttle of Georgia, 30:08

Masters Female: Marina Belyaeva of Russia, 33:37

Maine Male: Bob Winn of Ogunquit, 31:11

Maine Female: Julia Kirtland of South Harpswell, 35:07

Male Wheelchair: Jason Fowler of Massachusetts, 29:10

Female Wheelchair: Laurie Stephens of Wenham, Mass., 28:01 (course record)

1998

Elite Male: Johannes Mabilte of South Africa, 28:18

Elite Female: Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, 32:15

Masters Male: Steve Plasencia of Oregon, 29:37

Masters Female: Kim Jones of Washington, 34:35

Maine Male: Bob Winn of Ogunquit, 30:52 

Maine Female: Julia Kirtland of South Harpswell, 34:56

Male Wheelchair: Tony Nogueira of Glen Ridge, N.J., 24:32

Female Wheelchair: Leann Shannon of Florida, 28:38

 

TD Beach to Beacon 10K Fun Facts
Provided by race announcer Andy Schachat

Year by Year Breakdown of Finishers:

Year            Finishers     Cumulative Total

1998           2,408                    2,408

1999           3,248                    5,656

2000           3,429                    9,085

2001           3,718                    12,803

2002           4,109                    16,912

2003           4,273                    21,185

2004           4,353                    25,538

2005           4,305                    29,843

2006           4,810                    34,653

2007           4,839                    39,492

2008           5,248                    44,740

2009           5,618                    50,358       

2010           5,674                    56,032

2011           5,876                    61,908

Average number of finishers per year:  4,422

The following runners reached milestones in the history of the race:

1999: 5,000th finisher: Cheri Wessel, Hershey, Pennsylvania

2001: 10,000th finisher: Ron Fleurent, South Portland, Maine

2002: 15,000th finisher: John Morton, Ottawa, Ontario

2003: 20,000th finisher: Carl Curtsinger, Mt. Washington, Kentucky

2004: 25,000th finisher: Bonnie Cassidy, Ellicott City, Maryland

2006: 30,000th finisher: Ryan Dyer, Gorham, Maine

2007: 35,000th finisher: Michael Welch, South Portland, Maine

2008: 40,000th finisher: Tom Gilman, Falmouth, Maine

2009: 45,000th finisher: Adam Potter, Wells, Maine

2009: 50,000th finisher: Michael Moore, Orange, Connecticut

2010: 55,000th finisher: Sara Stempien, Portland, Maine

2011: 60,000th finisher: Wanda Mitchell, Auburn, Maine

  • The 3,092nd finisher of the 2012 TD Beach To Beacon 10K will be the 65,000th finisher in the history of the race

The TD Beach to Beacon 10K has Achieved the Following Milestones in the History of Maine Road Races:

1998: the first road race to have more than 2,000 timed finishers

1999: the first road race to have more than 3,000 timed finishers

2001: the first road race to have more than 3,500 timed finishers

2002: the first road race to have more than 4,000 timed finishers

2006: the first road race to have more than 4,500 timed finisher

2008: the first road race to have more than 5,000 timed finishers

2009: the first road race to have more than 5,500 timed finishers

  • From 1998-2004 and 2006-2010 the TD Beach to Beacon 10K was the largest race in Maine history. The 2005 race was the only one that did not exceed the number of finishers from the year before.
  • The 14 largest road races in Maine history are the 14 TD Beach to Beacon 10K races.
  • For the past six years, the TD Beach to Beacon 10K has been the largest road race in northern New England (Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont)

Total Miles Run

Number of finishers x 6.2 miles: 383,830

Average number of miles per year: 27,416

The following runners reached the following milestones

2000: 50,000th mile: Theo Berez, Camden, Maine

2002: 100,000th mile: Jennifer Cohen, Brunswick, Maine

2004: 150,000th mile: Christopher Pezzullo, Cape Elizabeth, Maine

2006: 200,000th mile: Jessica Shaknis, Portland, Maine

2008: 250,000th mile: Diane Gagnon, Old Orchard Beach, Maine

2009: 300,000th mile: David Lewis, Little Hocking, Ohio

2011: 350,000th mile: Trent Knoss, Boston

  • The 2,608th person to finish the 2012 TD Beach To Beacon 10K will run the 400,000th mile in the race's history

(Results provided by Granite State Race Services)

Weather Fact Rain drops have never fallen on a finisher of the TD Beach To Beacon 10K. A few times it rained the morning of the race and as the race started, but stopped before anyone crossed the finish line.

 

Joan Benoit Samuelson
RACE FOUNDER

Joan Benoit Samuelson, Maine’s most recognizable athlete who continues to serve as an inspiration for women runners around the world, founded the TD Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race, then known as the Peoples Beach to Beacon, in 1998 to benefit children’s charities in Maine. With the help of the bank, Joan’s efforts quickly elevated the annual race to world-class status. Today, the TD Beach to Beacon 10K is a ‘must’ event on the calendars of elite runners around the globe as well as recreational runners throughout New England. Joan ran the same ocean-side roads while growing up in Cape Elizabeth, just setting out on her path to history. While a senior at Bowdoin College, Benoit entered the 1979 Boston Marathon as a virtual unknown and won, setting a record for American women. Following surgery on her Achilles tendons, she again won the Boston Marathon in 1983. In Los Angeles in 1984, the eyes of the world were watching Joan when she won the first ever women's Olympic Marathon. She has remained a dominant figure and a role model in the running world and women’s athletics ever since. Below is more specific information about Joan’s athletic achievements and civic involvement:

MAJOR ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENTS

1972-75 All American Honors at Cape Elizabeth (Maine) H.S.

1975 Wins the regional Junior Olympic mile championship in 5:03.8

1976 Wins the Portland Boys Club 5-mile race

1976 Wins prestigious, 7.1-mile Falmouth Road Race on Cape Cod

1978 Sets world record in Boston’s Bonne Belle 10K race (33:16)

1979 Boston Marathon winner, World Best, (2:35:15)

1983 Boston Marathon winner, New World Best, (2:22:43)

1984 Wins the first U.S. women’s Olympic Marathon trials

1984 Olympic Gold Medalist in Los Angeles — First Women’s Olympic Marathon, (2:24:32)

1984 Philadelphia Half Marathon winner

1984 Jesse Owens Award recipient

1984 Inductee, Maine Sports Hall of Fame

1985 Chicago Marathon winner, time stood for 18 years as an American record (2:21:21)

1985 Receives Sullivan Award as country’s Top Amateur Athlete

1987 Honorary Degree Recipient, Williams College

1988 Tufts Jumbo Award recipient

1990 Kiputh Award, Yale University

1990 Honorary Degree recipient, Colby-Sawyer College

1990 Paul Harris Fellow, Rotary Club International

1992 Wins the Columbus (Ohio) Marathon

1993 Sara Orne Jewett Award, Maine Women’s Fund

1994 New England Women’s Leadership Award recipient

1994 First woman inducted into the National Alumni Hall of Fame of the Boys and Girls Club of America

1995 Honorary Degree recipient, Mount Ida College

1996 Finishes 13th in the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials

1997 Creates the former Peoples Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

1998 Wins the USA Track and Field Master’s national championship for women 40-and-over in the 5K

1998 Inductee, National Distance Running Hall of Fame

1998 Presides over the first Peoples Beach to Beacon 10K (now the TD Beach to Beacon), a road race branded one of the world's best by runners

1998 Road Runner’s Club of America, Women’s Master Runner of the Year

1998 Qualifies for U.S. 2000 Olympic Marathon trials at New York Marathon

1999 Honorary Degree recipient, Thomas College

1999 Inductee, International Scholar Athlete Hall of Fame

1999 Inductee, International Women’s Sports Foundation Hall of Fame

1999 Presides over the second TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon 10K. With a field of 4,000, including many of the world’s best distance runners, it eclipses the first

2000 Finishes 9th in the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials

2000 Presides over the third TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon 10K

2001 Presides over the fourth TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon 10K

2001 Qualifies for U.S. 2004 Olympic Marathon trials at New York Marathon

2002 For the first time, runs in the TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon 10K

2002 Sets national 45-49 age group record – 2:42.28 – at Chicago Marathon

2004 Injury prevents entry into U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials in St. Louis, plans run in 2008 trials.

2005 Receives Selma Black Award from Northeastern University.

2005 Qualifies for U.S. 2008 Olympic Marathon Trials at Twin Cities Marathon in Minnesota.

2006 Receives honorary degree from the University of New England

2007 US Track and Field Outstanding Athlete of the Year award for 50-54 age group

2007 For the second time, runs the TD Banknorth Beach to Beacon 10K, this time in a leisurely pace alongside friend Jacqueline Gareau, the 1980 Boston Marathon champ. They finish in 42 minutes

2008 Voted into the Olympic Hall of Fame; set a record in her age group in the 2008 Olympic trials

2008 Set U.S. Masters 50+ 5K Record – 17:24 in the USA 5K in Providence, Rhode Island on Sept. 21, 2008.

2009 Set U.S. Masters 50+ Indoor 3000m Record – 10:22.68 in Landover, Maryland on March 20, 2009

2009 RRCA (Road Runners Club of America) Female Master Runner of the Year

2011 115th Boston Marathon, 2:51.29; also won her age group 50-54

COMMUNITY AND CIVIC INVOLVEMENT

Committees and Boards:

1985-Present Advisory Board, Gulf of Maine Aquarium

1986-1993 Samantha Smith Center

1985-Present Friends of Casco Bay

1990-1991 Bowdoin College Fund Director - Chair

1990-1997 Honorary Board, Big Sisters Association of Boston

1991-1995 Foundation for the Advancement of Education

1994-1997 Freeport Recreation Committee

1995 Nominating Committee, YWCA of Portland, Maine

1995-Present Advisory Board, Maine’s Women Fund

1995-1996 Co-Chair, Casco Bay Area YMCA Capital Campaign

1995-Present Bowdoin College Board of Trustees

1995-Present Governor’s Council for Physical Education and Sports

1997-Present Governor’s Executive Council, Communities for Children

1997-Present Founder and Chair, Peoples Beach to Beacon 10K

1999-Present National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Board of Directors

2002 Honorary member American Running Association Gala

2002 Girl Scouts of Kennebec Council Woman of Distinction Award

2003-Present Named Co-Chair of Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Sports, Health & Wellness

Public Service, past and present:

Natural Resources Council of Maine; Maine Lung Association; Alzheimer’s Foundation; M.S. Society; Special Olympics; Freeport Public Schools; Massachusetts Association for the Blind; New England Women’s Leadership Award Nominating Committee; Maine Honorary Chair, March of Dimes Walk America; Maine Amateur Athletic Foundation, Board of Directors; Dana Farber Cancer Research Institute

Joan Benoit Samuelson resides in Freeport, Maine with her husband Scott Samuelson
 
 
Dave McGillivray
RACE DIRECTOR

David McGillivray first gained national prominence in 1978 when he ran across the United States to raise money for charity. Since then, McGillivray has accomplished numerous other inspirational and charitable feats, as well as earned a reputation as one of the world’s premier race directors.

President and Founder of DMSE, Inc. - also known as DMSE Sports - the company and its 75+ consultants manage more than 30 major road races and charitable events per year. In addition to the TD Beach to Beacon 10K, DMSE manages the B.A.A. Boston Marathon, Feaster Five Thanksgiving Day Run, Harvard Pilgrim Finish at the 50 5K & 10K at Patriot Place, the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk and the recently added New Balance Falmouth Road Race, to name a few. Since 1981, DMSE has organized or consulted on more than 900 events, raising millions for charity and earning a reputation as one of the most thorough, well organized race management firms in the U.S.

DMSE’s first event – the Bay State Triathlon at Wright’s Pond in Medford, Mass. – attracted 100 participants and was one of the first triathlons ever held in New England and the nation. McGillivray had competed in the 1980 Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii and brought the concept back to his native Northeast. A triathlete for years, McGillivray competed in eight Ironman triathlons and introduced the inspirational father-son team of Rick and Dick Hoyt to the sport. In January of 2011, he was inducted into the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame. Triathlons were just the beginning for DMSE. As the group organized more athletic events, McGillivray and his staff quickly earned a reputation as detail minded, safety oriented and creative thinkers in the competitive arena of event management. In 1988, the B.A.A Boston Marathon noticed and appointed McGillivray technical director of the world-famous marathon, and in 2001 he was appointed race director – a title he holds today. As DMSE grew, McGillivray added to his team, hand picking the best in start and finish line management, lead vehicle programs, runner registration and results, while working with local volunteers, race committees and police and fire departments to create a smooth operation come race day. So when Olympic Gold Medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson had an idea for a road race in her hometown of Cape Elizabeth, Maine, she reached out to McGillivray and his team.

The TD Beach to Beacon 10K was launched in 1998 (then called the Peoples Bank Beach to Beacon 10K) and is now among the most popular on the U.S. road race circuit, attracting some of the world’s fastest elite athletes and drawing rave reviews from participants. Others noticed as well. From the Bellin Run in Green Bay, Wis. and the Lady Speed Stick® Women's Half Marathon Series throughout the U.S. to Run-Walk to Home Base at Fenway Park and Run For The Dream in Williamsburg, Va., a DMSE race is known for being safe, organized, technically advanced and produced without flaws. In 2000, McGillivray and his team received the prestigious Race Director of the Year award from Road Race Management. In recent years, DMSE has also created several races which they now manage and own – the Spring Training Classic Road Race in Jupiter, Fla. which starts and ends where the Marlins and Cardinals train, the beautiful Run Gloucester! 7-Mile Road Race along the historic Cape Ann coast and the Harvard Pilgrim Finish at the 50 at Patriot Place where runners cross the finish line in Gillette Stadium, a race DMSE created with Loco Running - all successful signs of a top-notch race management company. Below is more specific info about his athletic achievements and professional accomplishments:

MAJOR ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENTS

Run Across America — 1978 Ran 3,452 miles from Medford, Oregon to Medford, Massachusetts in 80 consecutive days to raise money for the Jimmy Fund. This run ended in Fenway Park to a standing ovation by 32,000 fans. Hawaii Ironman Triathlon — 1980, 1983-1989 Competed eight times in the Hawaii Ironman Triathlon, the premier individual endurance event in the world. The Ironman consists of three back-to-back distance events: a 2.4-mile rough, open ocean water swim, followed by a 112-mile bike race and finished up with a full 26.2-mile marathon run. East Coast Run to Benefit the Jimmy Fund — 1980 Ran 1,250 miles from Winter Haven, Florida to Boston, joined by Bob Hall, a pioneer in wheelchair marathoning, to raise money for the Jimmy Fund. Met with President Carter at the White House during run. Wrentham State School 24-Hour Run — 1980 Designated as the “Run For Our Dreams Marathon,” this run traversed 120 miles in 24 hours through 31 communities in southeastern Mass., ending in Foxboro Stadium at halftime of a Pats game. Held to benefit the Wrentham State School for the Mentally Retarded, raised more than $10,000 for the handicapped. Empire State Building Run Up — 1981 The 4th Annual Empire State Building Run-Up. Course description: 86 stories, 1,575 steps, 1,050 feet in elevation, 40' stair height. Finished in 10th place overall in a time of 13 minutes, 27 seconds. New England Run — 1981 Triathloned (ran, cycled and swam) 1,522 miles throughout the six N.E. states, raising $55,000 for the Jimmy Fund. Unusual segments included running up and down Mt. Washington in N.H., swimming two miles across Lake Winnipesaukee, and running three miles with inmates inside Walpole State Prison. The Occluded Run For The Blind — 1982 Ran the 1982 Boston Marathon in a time of 3:14 while completely blindfolded and while being escorted by two guides. Raised more than $10,000 for the Carroll Center for the Blind in Newton, Mass. Martha’s Vineyard Swim — 1982 Officially completed his New England run by swimming more than seven miles from Martha’s Vineyard to Falmouth, Mass., again raising more money for the Jimmy Fund. McGillivray was greeted by thousands on shore including some of the world’s greatest runners, including Alberto Salazar. Jimmy Fund 24-Hour Swim — 1983 Swam for 24 consecutive hours in the Olympic-size Medford HS pool, swimming a total of 1,884 lengths and covering 26.27 miles (distance of the Boston Marathon) to raise money for the Jimmy Fund. Merrimack College New England Bike Ride — 1983 Bicycled more than 1,000 miles throughout six New England states in 14 days to raise money for a scholarship fund for Merrimack College, his alma mater. Jimmy Fund 24-Hour Bike — 1986 Biked for 24 consecutive hours around a five-mile loop course in Medford, Mass., while simultaneously directing the annual Bay State Triathlon, being held on the same course at the same time. Covered 385 miles. Walpole Prison Yard Marathon Formed the first sanctioned running club inside a maximum security institution. Conducted and ran in number of distance races inside prison yard, including winning a full 26.2 mile marathon against inmates. Annual Birthday Run — 1966 to Present Annually and on or near his birthday (August 22) runs the equivalent number of miles as his age. Has not missed a birthday since the age of 12. B.A.A Boston Marathon — 1971 to Present In addition to serving as race director, McGillivray runs the marathon the night of the race. McGillivray has completed 40 marathons – and this past marathon he crossed the finish line at midnight. Competitive Experience 40 consecutive Boston Marathons, 127 marathons completed, 8 Ironman Triathlons Personal Best: Marathon — 2:29:58; Ironman — 10:36:42

MAJOR PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS

DMSE, Inc. (Dave McGillivray Sports Enterprises - www.dmsesports.com), North Andover, Mass. President and Founder: DMSE, Inc. is a 31-year old special events management company which has produced or consulted on more than 900 mass-participatory athletic events throughout the world. McGillivray is also a seasoned motivational speaker who has inspired more than 1,500 audiences throughout the US and abroad.

Race Director: Has directed or consulted on the following events:

  • 1990 Triathlon World Championship, Walt Disney World; 1993 America’s Paradise Triathlon, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands; 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games – venue management road events; 1989-present Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk; 1998 Goodwill Games; 1997-present TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K; 2001-present B.A.A Boston Marathon; 2001 Monster Challenge: Tri Boston; 2001 B.A.A. Half Marathon; 2004 U.S. Olympic Women’s Marathon Trials, St. Louis; 2008 U.S. Olympic Women’s Marathon Trials, Boston; Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon, 2010. Also started several new races, including the Spring Training Classic in Jupiter, Fla., and the Harvard Pilgrim Finish at the 50 5K & 10K at Patriot Place. And starting in 2012, McGillivray and his team will direct the New Balance Falmouth Road Race on Cape Cod.

Agent: Has represented many of the top endurance athletes in the world, including:

  • Karen Smyers, Scott Molina, Dave Scott, Erin Baker, Mike Pigg, Ken Glah

Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) 1988-Present

  • Boston Marathon Race Director: Managed and oversaw all technical and operational aspects of the oldest and most prestigious marathon in the world. Successfully coordinated all of the technical aspects of the 100th running of the Boston Marathon in 1996, which attracted almost 40,000 participants. Named Race Director in 2001.

Hyde Athletic Industries 1982-1985

  • National Director of Promotions: Responsibilities included developing and managing the Saucony racing and triathlon teams, handling all event sponsorships and working with all the professional athletes under contract with Saucony.

Honors/Associations/Activities/Personal

• Recognized for 25 years with the B.A.A. Boston Marathon

• Inducted into the Triathlon Hall of Fame – 2011

• Celebrated 30 Years Running of DMSE Sports in 2011

• Received the Ron Burton Community Service Award – 2010

• Inducted into the Triathlon Hall of Fame – 2011

• Celebrated 30 Years Running of DMSE Sports - 2011

• Received the Fleet Feet, Inc. Lifetime Commitment to Running Award - 2010

• Awarded the prestigious “Jimmy Award” from the Jimmy Fund of Boston for his 30-year association and his work with helping to raise money to fund cancer research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute - 2009

• Named "Hero of Running" by Runner's World Magazine - 2007

• Awarded the Lazarus House “Christ the Servant Award” in 2006 for continuous dedication to the unloved and forgotten who are served by the Lazarus House Ministries.

• Proclaimed “Honorary Citizen” of the Town of Hopkinton, Massachusetts – March, 2007

• 2000 Race Director of the Year – Road Race Management

• Received “Lifetime Achievement Award” from Competitor Magazine

• Contributing writer for CoolRunning website and for New England Runner Magazine

• Honorary Chairman, Annual Medford Recreation “McGillivray Mini-Marathon”

• Past Vice President of the Jimmy Fund Council of Greater Boston

• President, Board of Directors of Massachusetts Bay State Games

• Member of the Board of Advisors of the Sports Museum of New England

• Member of the Governor’s Committee on Physical Fitness and Sports

• Honorary Coach of the Massachusetts Special Olympics Team

• Medford Citizen of the Year

• Chosen one of Boston’s Ten Most Outstanding Young Leaders

• Voted Outstanding Young Man of America

Charity and Fundraising

McGillivray, DMSE Sports and his DMSE Children’s Foundation have raised more than $50 million for various charities, including The Jimmy Fund, Carroll Center for the Blind, Cystic Fibrosis, Lazarus House, Massachusetts Dietetic Association, Massachusetts Special Olympics, Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD), Muscular Dystrophy Association, Sports Museum of New England, Wrentham State School

Motivational Speaking Engagements

Featured speaker at more than 1,500 motivational presentations during the past 28 years in every major U.S. city and internationally, including Canada, Denmark, England, France, Poland, and Sweden. Clients have included:

  • American College of Sports Medicine, Easter Seal Society, Johnston and Johnston, University of California, Raytheon Corp., Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Mass., Harvard Business School, New York Life Insurance Company, IBM, Walpole State Prison.
 
TD Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race
History of Race Beneficiaries

Each year, the TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, provides a cash donation of $30,000 to a different Maine charity as a way to support and benefit the state.

2012 Youth Beneficiary - The Center for Grieving Children

This year’s beneficiary of the TD Beach to Beacon 10K is The Center for Grieving Children, a Portland, Maine-based nonprofit organization providing support to bereaved children and families.

The CGC serves more than 4,000 grieving children, teens, families, and young adults each year through peer support, outreach, and education. Offering services at no charge for as long as people need them, the Center’s mission is to provide loving support that encourages the safe expression of grief and loss and fosters each individual’s resilience and emotional well-being.

The Center, located at 555 Forest Ave. in Portland, reaches individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds, and relies on financial contributions from individuals, businesses, foundations, United Way, and special events. For more information, call (207) 775-5216 or visit www.cgcmaine.org.

For more information about the Center’s programs and volunteer opportunities, call (207) 775-5216 or visit www.cgcmaine.org. View more information about the CGC's mission, Board of Directors and programs.

2011 Youth Beneficiary - Day One

Day One (www.day-one.org) provides substance abuse prevention, intervention, treatment and aftercare programs for Maine youth. The agency targets substance abuse at all stages with a wide-range of programs designed to meet the needs in communities across Maine. Headquartered in South Portland, Maine, Day One has been providing alcohol and drug treatment services since 1973 and mental health services since 1980. For additional information about Day One, including contact phone numbers and e-mails for concerned parents and family members seeking help, visit www.day-one.org.

2010 Youth Beneficiary - Junior Achievement of Maine

Junior Achievement of Maine (JA) is a non-profit organization providing economic education programs that help inspire Maine children to develop the skills, attitudes and behaviors of success in a global economy. Through JA classroom programs and Job Shadow experiences, JA of Maine, based in Portland, brings volunteers from the community face to face with students to make economic concepts relevant, raise aspirations, and challenge the students to excel. For more information on JA of Maine programs or to become a volunteer, call 207-347-4333 or visit online at www.maine.ja.org.

2009 Youth Beneficiary - Maine Handicapped Skiing Maine Handicapped Skiing (MHS), a non-profit organization that promotes year-round education and training for Maine children with physical disabilities by developing skills and providing enjoyment through active recreation. Based in Newry, Maine, MHS (www.skimhs.org) provides lessons in winter and summer, free of charge and with the help of more than 390 volunteers – making it the state’s largest year-round adaptive recreation program for children and adults with physical disabilities. FMI, call 800-639-7770 or visit online at www.skimhs.org.

2008 Youth Beneficiary – Susan L. Curtis Foundation The Susan L. Curtis Foundation is the sponsor of Camp Susan Curtis, a summer camp dedicated to improving the lives of economically disadvantaged Maine children ages 8-18. The organization provides traditional camping experiences interwoven with a leadership development and life skills curriculum. For more info, visit www.susancurtisfoundation.

2007 Youth Beneficiary – STRIVE STRIVE is a non-profit organization that serves 400 teens and young adults with intellectual and emotional disabilities by helping them use resources and participate as viable members of the community. Founded in 1999 and based in South Portland, STRIVE offers a range of programs and services through a safe and chem-free environment. For more info, visit www.pslstrive.org.

2006 Youth Beneficiary – Cape Elizabeth Education Foundation (CEEF) The Cape Elizabeth Education Foundation (CEEF) is a non-profit organization that enriches learning for Cape youth by funding innovative projects. CEEF also works to serve as a resource in helping other Maine towns interested in starting education foundations. CEEF was founded in 2001 by the Cape Elizabeth community with a goal to support the community's tradition of excellence in public education and prepare students for a lifetime of success by fostering a love of learning. www.capeeducationfoundation.org

2005 Youth Beneficiary - Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Portland and Auburn/Lewiston Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Portland and Auburn/Lewiston, a non-profit youth development organization, provides programs, activities and a nurturing environment to thousands of children in Maine. Combining a safe and supportive environment, trained professional staff and a nationally-recognized “curriculum”, the Clubs focus on developing skills in teamwork, personal health and safety, conflict resolution, resisting peer pressure, and citizenship and community service. www.bgcmaine.org

2004 Youth Beneficiary – Riding To The Top Therapeutic Riding Center Riding To The Top (RTT) provides therapeutic horseback riding services to children and adults with physical, emotional and/or learning disabilities. Formed in 1993, RTT believes that caring for horses and horseback riding are powerful tools for improving the lives of people with disabilities such as cerebral palsy, brain injury, developmental delays, autism, and for children deemed “at risk.” www.ridingtothetop.org

2003 Youth Beneficiary – Seeds of Peace Seeds of Peace, founded in 1993 by award-winning author and journalist John Wallach, is recognized as the leading international conflict resolution program for youth. Each summer, hundreds of teens identified as their nation’s best and brightest spend a month at Seeds of Peace International Camp in Otisfield, Maine, living side-by-side with people they have been led to hate. www.seedsofpeace.org

2002 Youth Beneficiary – Opportunity Farm Opportunity Farm opened in 1910, offering boys a safe home, a good education and hands-on farming skills. Its core mission has remained the same. While its 300 acres still includes a farm, Opportunity Farm has adapted to modern times. The dozens of boys and girls who live at the Farm, usually between the ages of 10 and 13, attend local public schools, participate in extracurricular activities and prepare for many different vocations in life. Daily life at the Farm follows the Family Teaching Program, modeled after the well-known course at Boys Town. www.opportunityfarm.org

2001 Youth Beneficiary – Kids First Founded as a partnership between Resources for Divorced Families and the Junior League of Portland Maine, Inc., the Kids First Center fills a much-needed gap in the social services available to children and parents. Through support groups for four different age groups, children are provided with a safe and neutral place to share their experiences and talk about what’s happening to their families. Trained facilitators, who are mental help professionals, design activities that focus on helping children build self-confidence. www.kidsfirstcenter.org

2000 Youth Beneficiary – Turning Point Farm Set on an idyllic 12-acre, 16-room farmhouse off Route 100 in New Gloucester, Turning Point Farm is for young boys and girls who have been abused or neglected and are in the care of the Maine Department of Human Services. The program is designed to allow for healing and growth while nurturing attachments with others, including animals. www.turningpointfarm.org

1999 Youth Beneficiary – Camp Sunshine Camp Sunshine supports critically ill children and their families. The camp has the distinction as one of the only programs in the nation whose mission is to address the impact of a critical illness on every member of the immediate family—the ill child, the parents, and the siblings. www.campsunshine.org

1998 Youth Beneficiary – Big Brothers/Big Sisters Big Brothers Big Sisters has been the nation's preeminent youth-service organization for nearly a century. The service is based on volunteers, and has been a proven success in creating and nurturing relationships between adults and children. www.SoMeBigs.org

 

TD Bank Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race

About TD Bank, the Title Sponsor


About TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank

TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank, is one of the 10 largest banks in the U.S., providing nearly 8 million customers with a full range of retail, small business and commercial banking products and services at more than 1,280 convenient locations throughout the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Metro D.C., the Carolinas and Florida. In addition, TD Bank and its subsidiaries offer customized wealth management services through TD Wealth, insurance products and services through TD Insurance, Inc., and vehicle financing and dealer commercial services through TD Auto Finance. TD Bank is headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J., and Portland, Maine. To learn more, find TD Bank on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TDMoneyLoungeUS, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/TDBank_US or visit www.tdbank.com.

TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank, is a member of TD Bank Group and a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank of Toronto, Canada, a top 10 financial services company in North America and one of the few banks in the world rated Aaa by Moody's. The Toronto-Dominion Bank trades on the New York and Toronto stock exchanges under the ticker symbol "TD." To learn more, visit www.TD.com.

About the TD Charitable Foundation

The TD Charitable Foundation is funded by TD Bank N.A., which operates as TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®, and is one of the 10 largest commercial banking organizations in the United States. The Foundation's mission is to serve the individuals, families and businesses in all the communities where TD Bank operates, having made $89.2 million in charitable donations since its inception in 2002. The Foundation’s areas of focus are affordable housing, financial literacy and education, and the environment. More information on the TD Charitable Foundation, including an online grant application, is available at www.TDBank.com.

View a TD Bank Business Profile with more detailed information about the company.



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